Total Knee Replacement


Diagram of total knee replacement.  Metal component on femur caps the bone after a sliver of arthritic surface has been removed. Metal component on tibia has polyethylene (plastic) insert that snaps in.
Diagram of total knee replacement. Metal component on femur caps the bone after a sliver of arthritic surface has been removed. Metal component on tibia has polyethylene (plastic) insert that snaps in.

Total knee replacement helps patients dealing with knee arthritis get back to their usual activities with less pain and better function. Dr. Nigro uses an innovative technique called kinematic total knee alignment to maximize the best possible outcomes for patients.

X-ray of total knee replacement.  Metal components show up as white.
X-ray of total knee replacement. Metal components show up as white.

Kinematically aligned total knee replacement restores the arthritic joint surfaces back to their original pre-arthritic position. This is done by accounting for the amount of bone and cartilage wear on the medial and lateral sides of the knee joint throughout its motion arc, and restoring these surfaces with the smooth surface of the total knee prosthesis. This brings the kinematic (motion) axes back to their natural alignment. This technique AVOIDS the need for cutting ligaments and tendons in the knee as is typically required in traditional knee replacements. This gives patients a quicker recovery and better function with a more natural feeling knee than with traditional methods.

Knee replacement is typically done with patients staying in the hospital for one or two nights. Patients start walking the day of or morning after surgery depending on whether surgery was in the morning or afternoon. Overall, patients can expect to have substantial pain relief and better function after their total knee replacement.

Nurse Gets Back on Her Feet After Knee Replacement

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